OVSP is Giving Soccer Back to the Kids!

Welcome to OVSP! Thank you for making this possible for our kids.

With our inaugural season just beginning we thank you for entrusting your kids into our care. We are excited to serve the community, support the family, and strengthen kids here in the South Bay! With over 80 kids participating (K-3rd grade), we are grateful for this vibrant beginning and look forward to many seasons to come!

We want to thank all of you from day one for making this league such a tremendous success! Young and old alike will give testimony that, "This isn’t just any ordinary soccer league.” OVSP is a youth league for both boys and girls with a focus on kids winning in the game of life. Character, sportsmanship, and teamwork are emphasized, as every child receives personal attention and equal playing time. We are all committed to making an immediate and lasting difference in the lives of San Diego families.

Youth sports across the country continue to gain momentum as participation numbers are on the increase, yet, as experts agree, the atmosphere in which the games are played is many times less than positive. Just about anyone who has spent time around youth sports these days has had a very bad experience and has heard of plenty more. A survey of 3,300 parents published in the January/February issue of SportingKid magazine last year found that 84 percent had witnessed “violent parental behavior” toward children, coaches, or officials at kids’ sports events; 60 percent said they had been victims of such behavior. Not to mention the weekly verbal abuse and lack of adult self-control witnessed by the ultimate victims, the children.

In the past decade, some disturbing new trends have emerged. Children are starting in sports younger, specializing in one sport earlier, and may play the same sport year-round. The consequences of such activity are not yet fully understood, but sports physicians say stress injuries among kids are way up, and coaches say some of the most talented athletes drop out by their teens. For many parents the demands of toting kids to practice, travel games, and tournaments are taking a big toll on what used to be called family life. In the past 20 years, says Alvin Rosenfeld, a New York psychiatrist who specializes in adolescents, structured sports time has doubled while family dinners have been cut by a third and family vacations have decreased 28 percent. “There’s been a huge growth in highly competitive youth sports,” says Paul Roellig, a Virginia coach and parent. “The question nobody’s asking is, is this a good thing?”

A survey last summer at the National PTA Convention in Charlotte, N.C., found 56 percent of parents saying that youth sports were too competitive, nearly half said that organized youth sports need to be completely revamped, and half said if they could change one thing, they would want their coach to be less focused on winning. Many surveys support this conclusion: Most kids would prefer to play a lot on a team that loses than sit on the bench of a team that wins.

In soccer, the odds are even longer, because so many colleges recruit foreign players. “It’s not a worthy objective at the elementary level to push kids to embrace a professional sports vision," Doyle says, “which is what some of these coaches are telling kids and parents alike. You know, ‘If you don’t play for me you’re not going to get to college."

By the numbers • Dan Doyle • Executive Director of the Institute for International Sport at the University of Rhode Island • The Encyclopedia of Sports Parenting

By the numbers • Dan Doyle • Executive Director of the Institute for International Sport at the University of Rhode Island • The Encyclopedia of Sports Parenting

Equally crazy, experts say, is the idea that child stars can be created by starting early. “It doesn’t matter when you start a sport. If you start at 3, it doesn’t necessarily help,” says Paul Stricker, a pediatric sports medicine specialist in San Diego. “Kids develop sports skills in a very sequential manner, just like they do sitting up and walking and talking. Parents and coaches just don’t understand that sequence. They feel that after they’re potty trained, if they practice something enough they’ll get it.” Parents, some coaches say, are often fooled by “early maturers,” kids who are big and well-coordinated at a young age. But often it’s the late bloomers, who had to work longer and harder at sports, who turn into the stars.

At OVSP we believe that every child is destined to be a superstar as a spouse, parent, leader, employee, student, friend, and community servant.

At OVSP we believe that every child is destined to be a superstar as a spouse, parent, leader, employee, student, friend, and community servant. Therefore, we seek to share with them the true source of their real significance. We are committed to providing our community with a non-competitive soccer league that keeps the main thing the main thing, which is serving our community, supporting the family, and strengthening kids. Here at OVSP kids can be kids and fun is never overshadowed by the pressure of competition.

If you have any questions or feedback for us, please do not hesitate to call (619.424.7870).

Pastor Steve Boschen